Typical Home School Day with 6 Kids

typical

Typical Homeschool Day With 6 Kids

We are frequently asked “How do you do it?”

Most of the time I answer “Day by Day.” 

 

Each of our children is so unique and they each learn in such different ways. One day of homeschooling in detail… this is going to be tough. Our home school days vary from the “sit down” school days to the “doing things” home school days. I am guessing that most people want to know about the “sit down” home school days when they ask, so that is what I will write about today.

 

Our “Sit Down” School Day Schedule:

 

6:00 am – I am a morning person. So this is the time I am awake and start setting the school day up. I love the quiet of the morning. Even when the kids start getting up, about 6:30, they will see me working at the dining room table and will understand two things:

  1. Today is a “sit down” school day
  2. Mom needs some time to get it set up

My setting up of the school day works pretty easily in the morning. What they will be studying for the year has already been prepared in the summer. What I plan on finishing this year I planned in the summer. What I know I need them to accomplish this week I have noted from the previous week’s work and so it’s pretty straight forward.

I write up the days work on a 5″ x 8″ sheet of notebook paper, I love these little notebooks. Each child has one of these written up by me that morning for a check off sheet. I list each subject and what I expect the child to accomplish for that day in that subject. At the end of the day I expect the work finished and the check off sheet returned.

Our “sit down” school day is always finished by noon. We have a life and doing “school” is only part of it. Here is a sample of what one of the lists would look like:

 

lesson

 

 

7:00 am – I am usually done getting things set up by now. Each child’s pile of books for the day is in a stack on the dining room table along with their assignment list on top for them to check off as they do each thing. I will usually review each list with each child and highlight anything I feel may be unusual or they might find interesting.

An example might be if I usually have a child only do 1/2 hour of reading and there is 1 hour listed on their sheet. The explanation might be that the child needs to finish up the reading book he is working through so his book report can be started the following day or week.

breakfast

 

8:00 am – noon – School starts around 8:00 or 8:30 on a “sit down” school day. Some kids will take their lists before that and start on maybe their reading so that their school work is finished up faster.

Chores and breakfast has been finished up before we sit down. Plans for lunch have been discussed. Kids are all dressed and have pencils and their piles of books and their lists.

 

We each take a spot at the table. Mind you it’s a BIG table.

Side note: Usually my two oldest girls do their school upstairs in their room. One is a freshman in college so she does all her work online and we review anything that she wants review at night. The other is a junior in high school and is doing courses for college online and also has a list made up for homeschool but it is a monthly list of things to accomplish. That’s the way she likes her work laid out for her and it has worked well for her for years.

At the table I usually sit at the end of the table with my 2 youngest children on either side of me. After them on either side are the next 2 older children.

They do not do all of their work sitting at the table. Their reading they usually take into the living room on a comfortable chair, whether it’s their history reading or whatever.

I don’t think they love doing “sit down” school but it’s a necessary part of our lives. We do not do sit down school 5 days a week. I think it is more like 3 days a week. The other days they are working on projects or writing plays or building drones or something that does not involve mom making a list to follow. So, when we go to do a “sit down” school day it’s not so bad, since they had their break of a day or more.

 

I do not believe that all learning comes from textbooks.

I do believe that textbooks are a tool and I use them like a tool. They do not control our lives but add something to it. They are useful but not necessarily how my children learn best.

As we are sitting around the table the children will ask questions and I will read lessons to my 7yo and we try not to be too loud so that those reading can concentrate. Everyone is trying to get finished so they can do something else. I only schedule enough work as to fill 3-4 hours.

10:00 – The kids are looking for a snack about now so I usually have them each do their spelling tests, one at a time, and once finished they grab themselves a snack. We use Spelling Power for spelling, so there is a test each day. Each word the child spells incorrectly he/she writes the word 10 times, like I said, I don’t use curriculum “as written”. When they are done writing their words, it’s off for a snack, kind of an incentive to finish up quickly.

While snacking they are still working. Snack and drink on the table at their right with books and pencils in hand. Sometimes I will ask that the drinks get finished up quickly so they don’t spill on the school books.

Something funny: Most of the time they all do the same subjects at the same time. Like math, all of the older children use Saxon math and usually there are 3 different level Saxon math books open on the table at once, the three boys. My 7yo daughter  is still using ABeka Math but will switch over to Saxon this next year or so, but her math will be out also. Not really sure why they all seem to do the same subjects together but it usually works out that way.

Is there squabbling? Of course… One child will ask another “not to say numbers out loud” the other child will say “but you are” and the first child will say that “he is not as loud as the other child”. Whatever, I remind each of them to not say numbers out loud, or if they need to say a number out loud to me, to make sure they announce “i need to say a number out loud” just in case another child is doing a calculation in their head.

It’s pretty smooth going, the children are looking forward to being finished for the day. We do have rough days but not many. This is a way of life for us after 25 years. It’s just what we do so there is not much complaining because well, what would be the point?

That’s it….

Noon – lunch and the rest of the day is theirs.

 

lunch

 

I hope this was helpful in seeing part of what we do in a “sit down” school day.

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Homeschool Portfolios: Planning 3

portfolios-1

In my last post I wrote about how I go about picking the topics I use to plan my portfolio at the beginning of the year so it is ready for the end of the year.

There is one more BIG piece of how I do it that I thought I would share with you. 

After I have my schedule of what needs to be done each month (the first post on this series) and I have the topics I will be studying (the second post in this series) I move onto the this part of the process which I will call my organization of all those papers 🙂

My Organization of All Those Papers

What papers? You ask. Well, if you have been following along with this series of posts you now have a plan of what needs to be done and what topics you want to do for the year. The next step is to combine these to topics into useful samples to send in.

For each topic I print up a paper to match or write up my plan for picture taking for the topic. I am going to use the sample from the second post in this series for my examples below.

For your convenience I am going to list them here again so you don’t have to keep looking back and forth between posts.

Here is WHAT I said I would study from the second post in my series about portfolio creation.

  • Language Arts
    • Phonics
    • Beginning Spelling
    • Handling Books
    • Handwriting
  • Math
    • Counting
    • Beginning Addition and Subtraction Facts
    • Measurement
    • Money
  • History
    • Farm and Zoo
    • Basic Geography Terms
    • Making a Simple Map
    • Neighborhood Helpers
  • Physical Education
    • Riding Horses
  • Health
    • Personal Hygiene
  • Science
    • Farm Animals
    • Birds
    • Plants
    • Weather
  • Fine Arts
    • Painting

Here is WHEN I said I would do them from the first post in this series:

  1. August
    a. Language Arts: 1 sample
    b. Math: 1 sample
    c. Science: 1 sample (a report on a topic, 1st of the written samples)
    d. List of 2 books to read this month (only month with 2 books)
    e. Fine Arts: 1 sample  (done with Fine Arts for the year)
  2.  September
    a. Language Arts: 1 sample
    b. Math: 1 sample
    c. History: 1 sample (a report on a topic, 2nd of the written samples)
    d. 1 book to read this month
    e. Physical Education: 1 sample (done with Phys. Ed. for the year)
  3. October
    a. Science: 1 sample
    b. 1 book to read this month
    c. Health: 1 sample (done with Health for the year)
  4. November
    a. Language Arts: 1 sample (book report, 3rd of the written samples)
    b. Math: 1 sample
    c. History: 1 sample
    d. 1 book to read this month
  5. December
    a. Language Arts: 1 sample (create a poem, 4th and done the written samples for the year)
    b. Math: 1 sample
    c. Science: 1 sample
    d. 1 book to read this month
  6. January
    a. History: 1 sample
    b. 1 book to read this month
  7. February
    a. Language Arts: 1 sample
    b. Math: 1 sample
    c. Science: 1 sample (done with Science for the year)
    d. 1 book to read this month
  8. March
    a. Language Arts: 1 sample (done with LA for the year)
    b. Math: 1 sample (done with Math for the year)
    c. State History Topic: 1 sample (done with History for the year)
    d. 1 book to read this month
  9. Aprila. 1 book to read this month (done, you now have your 10 books for the book-list for the Literature section)

WHAT Do I Do With All This Information?

I create folders for each month which contain the papers for that months work.

So for the month of August my schedule states that I will be doing:

a. Language Arts: 1 sample
b. Math: 1 sample
c. Science: 1 sample (a report on a topic, 1st of the written samples)
d. List of 2 books to read this month (only month with 2 books)
e. Fine Arts: 1 sample  (done with Fine Arts for the year)

So I look over my topics for the year and stick them right in this outline.

So August will look like this:

a. Language Arts: Phonics
b. Math: Counting
c. Science: Farm Animals (report)
d. List of 2 books to read this month 
e. Fine Arts: Painting

Let’s do September:

a. Language Arts: Beginning Spelling
b. Math: Beginning Addition and Subtraction Facts
c. History: Farm and Zoo (report)
d. 1 book to read this month
e. Physical Education: Bike Riding Picture

Want me to continue? Here are the other months:

  1. October
    a. Science: Birds
    b. 1 book to read this month
    c. Health: First Aid Kit
  2. November
    a. Language Arts: Handling Books
    b. Math: Measurement
    c. History: Basic Geography Terms
    d. 1 book to read this month
  3. December
    a. Language Arts: Handwriting
    b. Math: Money
    c. Science: Plants
    d. 1 book to read this month
  4. January
    a. History: Making a Simple Map
    b. 1 book to read this month
  5. February
    a. Language Arts: Pick another topic or done if you use 4 samples
    b. Math: Pick another topic or done if you use 4 samples
    c. Science: Weather
    d. 1 book to read this month
  6. March
    a. Language Arts: Pick another topic or done if you use 4 samples
    b. Math: Pick another topic or done if you use 4 samples
    c. State History Topic: Neighborhood Helpers
    d. 1 book to read this month
  7. April
    a. 1 book to read this month (done, you now have your 10 books for the book-list for the Literature section)

NOW you have that all made up.

Use this new outline to create a nice neat set of file folders tabbed by month or a three ring binder that contains dividers by month. 

In the very front of the three ring binder or the file folders you will have the nice check off sheet you made.

In the August section you are going to place 3 pieces of paper and a note for yourself.

  1. 1st piece of paper: Head online and search for a phonics worksheet and print it up, stick it in the August section.
  2. 2nd piece o paper: Now search for a counting sheet and print it up and place that in the August section.
  3. 3rd piece of paper: Now a form for writing a farm animal report can be found online or just use a piece of plain paper with lines at the bottom and a place for a picture at the top. Stick that in the August section also.
  4. Your note: On your note for this month list the 2 books to read this month and a note to have him paint a picture for you this month.

This is what you are collecting for August as a reminder:

a. Language Arts: Phonics
b. Math: Counting
c. Science: Farm Animals (report)
d. List of 2 books to read this month 
e. Fine Arts: Painting

You will continue this for each of your monthly sections. you should have papers or notes in all of your sections. I will list September’s section here, but I think you get it and won’t bore you with listing them all.

September’s organization of papers.

In September section you will again have 3 pieces of paper and 1 note for yourself. (this won’t be the same every month of course)

  1. 1st piece of paper: Head online and print up a beginning spelling worksheet and place it in the September section.
  2. 2nd piece of paper: Print up a beginning addition and subtraction facts worksheet and put it in the section.
  3. 3rd piece of paper: As with last month you can either print up a form to write a report or just use a plain piece of paper with some lines at the bottom and an area at the top to draw a picture and place this in your September section.
  4. Your note: On your note you will write the name of the book to read this month and a note for yourself to remember to take a picture of your child riding his bike.

This is what you are collecting for September, as a reminder;

a. Language Arts: Beginning Spelling
b. Math: Beginning Addition and Subtraction Facts
c. History: Farm and Zoo (report)
d. 1 book to read this month
e. Physical Education: Bike Riding Picture

After you have all these papers organized for the year you are all set to get going on what you really want to accomplish for you and your child.

The first week of each month take out the packet of papers and the note and get those things done for your portfolio creation.

REMEMBER: Stick them back in the folder when accomplished so you know where they will be when you need them.

The rest of the month is yours to do with as you choose!

Hope this series on portfolio creation was helpful and if I think of anything else helpful I will blog it 🙂 if you have questions please feel free to ask.

If you would find it useful for me to write all the months out just  let me know and it will get done. Have a great week!

Homeschool Portfolios: Planning 2

portfolios-1

In my last post I mentioned I would show you how I plan at the beginning of the year for a portfolio at the end of the year that showed educational success and improvement from the previous year. Here is what I do. This is a follow-up to this post: Homeschool Portfolio: Planning 1

Decide What Topics You Will Teach In Each Subject Area

This step takes a quite a bit of work. Not really.

For our state I am going to be sending in samples for 8 subject areas. Sounds daunting but wait till it’s broken down.

Three of those subject areas only require 1 sample each. It’s not to hard to plan 1 topic for those 3 subject areas: Physical Education, Health, and Fine Arts.

Down to 5 areas..

One subject area “Literature” only requires a list of 10 books the child has read or have been read to the child. Not too hard to plan 10 books over a period of 10 months.

Lastly, 4 areas require 4-6 samples each. This takes a bit more planning but still, I find that it’s not too hard to plan out 4 pieces of paper for each of these areas: Language Arts, Math, History, and Science.

How do I figure these all out?

I am going to take them one subject at a time and show you how I do it.

-Physical Education

What does my child like to do? Some ideas: ride bikes, play soccer, yoga, climb trees, or stretching exercise. I just need one sample so I know I can get a picture of him riding his bike so I make a note that I will be taking a picture of him bike riding for my portfolio sample. Done

-Health

What are some areas of health that are pretty easy? How about dental health, nutrition, heart health, or first aid kit. Well I do have a first aid kit and it would be a good thing for him to know how to use the items in it. So, I will use first aid  kit as my topic and my sample for my portfolio will be a drawing he makes of a first aid kit and a couple definitions of what a few of the items are used for. Done

-Fine Arts

What counts as fine arts? Some areas are music lessons, listening to music, drawing, craft projects, sewing, and painting. Now I know that he loves painting and will most likely paint something this year without me even asking him to. So, that will be my topic for this years Fine Arts area. Done

-Language Arts

I have some old standbys that I use each year. These include: spelling, vocabulary, handwriting, grammar, poetry, letter writing, reports, parts of speech, note taking, learning to read, phonics, composition, book reports, capitalization, and punctuation. There are more, but I only need 4-6 so I choose them from this list and then I am done picking my topics for this area.

-Math

I also have some regulars I have for this area but another way to do it would be to go online and look up math topics by grade and pick 4-6 of them to list. My favorites are: addition, decimals, subtraction, multiplication, division, mixed numbers, Roman numerals, fractions, percents, ratios, averages, area, volume, angles, perimeter, negative numbers, counting, measurement, metric conversion, and geometry. I have others but I just choose 4-6 of these  and then I am finished with the topics for math.

-History

What would you like to study this year? As for everything you should have this look different for each year so it shows improvement and academic growth. I do list map skills nearly every year though. Areas we use regularly are maps, map skills, geography, US history, Canada, continents, states and capitals, world history, economics, government, state history, basic geography terms, farms, citizenship, and world cultures. I pick 4-6 of these for my list of topics.

-Science

What would your child like to study this year? What did you study last year? It should be different this year. Some of my favorite areas of study are plants, botany, animals, invertebrates, rocks, minerals, volcanoes, earthquakes, air and water, pollution, human body, biology, chemistry, farm animals, birds, weather, aerodynamics, experiments, dissection, and disease and the immune system. I take 4-6 of these and I am all done with my topics for science.

-Literature

What is my child reading or what do I want to read to my child or what books on tape can we get from the library? I usually start with where my child is by grade level and look up online a list of books that would normally be read at this grade level. I find ones I know or feel would be okay to have my child read and make up a list. I also look online at my library’s books on tape list see if any of these books could be listened to in the car on our way around town. This has worked really well when I can find at least 5 of them as books on tape and 5 that I will read to the children or that a child will read himself. Done

What if I have curriculum I am using?

Of course if you have a set of books you are using for math or language arts or any subject,  you could just take the first 4-6 chapters and use those topics for these topic lists. But if not then this information might be useful to you. I do have books for my children’s subjects but I don’t always use those chapters as my topic lists and I just list ones that are easier to document like the ones listed above.

Once I have all these picked out I list them in outline form so that I can use it as a check off list for during the year showing what I have done and have left to do.

Here is a sample:

  • Language Arts
    • Phonics
    • Beginning Spelling
    • Handling Books
    • Handwriting
  • Math
    • Counting
    • Beginning Addition and Subtraction Facts
    • Measurement
    • Money
  • History
    • Farm and Zoo
    • Basic Geography Terms
    • Making a Simple Map
    • Neighborhood Helpers
  • Physical Education
    • Bike Riding
  • Health
    • First Aid Kit
  • Science
    • Farm Animals
    • Birds
    • Plants
    • Weather
  • Fine Arts
    • Painting

I also organize my paperwork to more easily accomplish my goals for covering these topics during the year, but that’s for another post.

I hope this was helpful to you.

Homeschooling Portfolios: Planning 1

 

portfolios-1

In our state we have the option of sending in a portfolio for our end of the year assessment of what we have done for the year homeschooling.

Over the past 25 years I have kind of figured out what they really want to see. Here is how I plan my year around the end game of sending in a portfolio.

 

#1 Figure Out What Your State Requires for Samples

In our state I have found that they require:

  • 4 to 6 samples for each of these subjects: Language Arts, Math, Science, and History (also one of these history samples need to be state specific)
  • 1 sample for each of these subjects: Physical Education, Fine Arts, and Health
  • Finally they like a list of 10 books read for Literature
  • In the accumulation of this small bit of samples the state also likes to see 4 samples of written work of which the difficulty varies depending upon the age of the child. These are not in addition to the above samples but are included in the above numbers.

This information tells me that I will need to plan on about one sample a month for 6 months for each of these: Language Arts, Math, Science, and History.

BUT for Physical Education, Fine Arts, and Health I will only need to work on these for a single month.

The last thing this information tells me is that my child needs to read at least 1 book a month (or have me read it to him). This way I will have 10 books for a list in my portfolio.

#2 When Does Your Portfolio Need to Be Submitted?

I know our portfolios need to be in before Labor Day but anytime after March 1st is acceptable. So when doing my planning I work from the idea that I want to send it in as soon as possible and be done with all the required stuff. For me this has been kind of a game of getting everything done in order to get them sent in by April 1st which is a silly date anyway 🙂

All my planning is done by months so knowing I have August through April to work with gives me the parameters I need to start my portfolio planning.

  • August –
  • September –
  • October –
  • November –
  • December –
  • January –
  • February –
  • March –
  • April –
  • May – I usually give myself the extra month just in case I need it

 

#3 Plan Out When You Will Do Each Sample

After I know the number of samples and the number of months I have to accomplish these samples I can break down what I will be doing each month. Here is the minimum of what I would do:

  1. August

    a. Language Arts: 1 sample
    b. Math: 1 sample
    c. Science: 1 sample (a report on a topic, 1st of the written samples)
    d. List of 2 books to read this month (only month with 2 books)
    e. Fine Arts: 1 sample  (done with Fine Arts for the year)

  2.  September

    a. Language Arts: 1 sample
    b. Math: 1 sample
    c. History: 1 sample (a report on a topic, 2nd of the written samples)
    d. 1 book to read this month
    e. Physical Education: 1 sample (done with Phys. Ed. for the year)

  3. October

    a. Science: 1 sample
    b. 1 book to read this month
    c. Health: 1 sample (done with Health for the year)

  4. November

    a. Language Arts: 1 sample (book report, 3rd of the written samples)
    b. Math: 1 sample
    c. History: 1 sample
    d. 1 book to read this month

  5. December

    a. Language Arts: 1 sample (create a poem, 4th and done the written samples for the year)
    b. Math: 1 sample
    c. Science: 1 sample
    d. 1 book to read this month

  6. January

    a. History: 1 sample
    b. 1 book to read this month

  7. February

    a. Language Arts: 1 sample
    b. Math: 1 sample
    c. Science: 1 sample (done with Science for the year)
    d. 1 book to read this month

  8. March

    a. Language Arts: 1 sample (done with LA for the year)
    b. Math: 1 sample (done with Math for the year)
    c. State History Topic: 1 sample (done with History for the year)
    d. 1 book to read this month

  9. April

    a. 1 book to read this month (done, you now have your 10 books for the book-list for the Literature section)

As you can see by this list there is not a huge workload in order to accomplish a portfolio of your students work.

Without a plan it does seem very daunting but taking a few minutes to figure this information out makes it look doable.

Personally I do a bit more work than this.

For the months from August till April we do a sample for each of these subjects: Language Arts, Math, History, and Science. Then at the end of the year I have 9 samples to choose from in each area.

We are always doing art projects so there is easily one a month for the younger crowd.

Physical education is way more than one with the kids doing soccer in the fall and spring, ice skating in the winter, and martial arts weekly, etc we have way more than one sample.

BUT in a tough year I know what the minimum I will need to accomplish in order to submit a thorough portfolio in April or even in July if it was a real tough year.

I am going to take you one step further and show you what I do at the beginning of the year to make sure my portfolio is educationally sound and looks like my kid did something and improved or at least did something different from last year.

BUT that’s for my next post. Hope this was helpful. Have a great weekend.

Here is a link to that post: Homeschool Portfolios: Planning 2

 

The HOME in Homeschooling

Lot’s of changes here. Being without a vehicle has made homeschooling so much easier. It used be that we were fighting with outside activities for time but now we have so much time. The house is neater and the schoolwork is all caught up.  More on that in a minute. So our list of what we accomplished this week is different but more fulfilling.

What we did do this week:

  • Weatherized the house: well we didn’t, but a crew was here working on that all week
  • Church
  • Workbook work
  • Easy Peasy Online School
  • Costco shopping with a friend and our little ones
  • Orthodontist appointment: Artist got her braces off 🙂
  • Math drills
  • Read lots to the younger kids
  • Played around with water and our freezing temperatures outside
  • Church
  • Created a new cleaning system for ourselves

The HOME in Homeschooling

So many things pull us out of our homes. There are the lessons like music or foreign language, there are classes like a science co-op or drama group, there are sports activities like soccer or open gym, there are just so many awesome activities for us as homeschoolers, how do you choose?

Well, our choice was made for us with the demise of our latest vehicle. We were doing so many activities every week. Here is a list of things we did with the homeschool group before our vehicle bit the dust:

  • Science co-ops: ran these and participated
  • Drama club
  • Homeschool Choir
  • Singing at nursing homes
  • Ice skating
  • Homeschool meetings: set-up and lead most of them
  • Open gym
  • Yearbook: started and ran
  • and, and, and

That is just a partial list of our weekly things to do with/for our homeschool group. There are also field trips, the soccer team, talent shows, spelling bees, you name it, our group was doing it. Most of it was organized and run by us.

Now, these are all wonderful things to do. Really there are. But the HOME in homeschooling was becoming the, “get what you can get done in the time left” schooling. We were gone so much we wondered if our home was more of a motel than a house. My husband and I would laugh when saying this and then look at each other like, ” Really? Is this what we have become?”

We would spend our mornings preparing to be gone again:

  • Packing lunches
  • Collecting workbooks for down times
  • Final prep for co-op lessons to teach
  • Collecting supplies for co-op classes
  • Rushing to do our animal chores
  • Eat a quick breakfast
  • And slamming that door behind us to a now empty house

That was a typical Monday. Don’t get me wrong, we would get all of our schoolwork accomplished but had barely any time to relax when we were home. When we got home we were exhausted. This was a typical week:

  • Monday: Co-op classes, Drama club, Yearbook all in the afternoon
  • Tuesday: Ice skating in the morning or Soccer in the afternoon, and Homeschool meetings in the evenings once a month
  • Wednesday: Field trips in the morning once a month and Homeschool Q&A in the afternoon once a month
  • Thursday: Open gym in the afternoon
  • Friday: Home

Now as you can see these are all taking up only parts of the day. Some were just mornings or just afternoons but I would have to plan out my week and figure out when we would get our actual schoolwork done. Each day we would get these activities and our schoolwork done but at what cost? There has to be a limit.

Someone once said to me, “If your not home is it really homeschooling?” Now there are many ways to homeschool, don’t get me wrong, but the way we were doing it was just was to hectic for us. We needed time to crash and not worry about the activities for the next day.

Helping to keep out homeschool group going for the last 3-4 years has been a blessing and a burden. We are a veteran homeschooling family and love to share what we have found works. This is our 22nd year homeschooling and we know a few things that could be helpful to a family starting out and love sharing that knowledge. We also know how to fit it all in since we have homeschooled for so long that it is just a way of life for us.  Homeschooling is the natural thing for us to do each day.

So what have we learned by being home more and not doing all those activities?

  • The homeschool group can survive without us
  • Our children are happier to just chill
  • We accomplish our schoolwork so much faster
  • We like to sleep in a little later
  • Our afternoons are ours again to do what makes us happy
  • The house is cleaner since we are here to keep it neat (kinda weird that is was so much messier when we were here less…)
  • I am a more relaxed mama
  • I have my weekends back: not planning 3 co-op classes for Monday has totally freed up my weekends

My advice…

Pick and choose what you children will participate in. We have 6 kids still at home and could easily make a legitimate excuse for every activity we were doing but how did those choices change us as a family?

Make it a point to be home with your kids. There will always be something else to participate in but for this time just choose home.

Socializing is a hot topic… make time to spend with others but cherish this time you have with your children. Too soon they will be graduating and you will wonder where all the time went.

What do you think? Let us know 🙂

Lastly a picture from this week… Artist got her braces off. A beautiful smile on a beautiful young lady.

no braces

Happy Homeschooling!

Monday Musings

Plans for the week ahead

This week we are doing Cells & DNA during co-op class. It is going to be so fun!! I lead a Breastfeeding Support Group and it meets this Tuesday after Ice Skating. Out topic this week is a Breastfeeding Jeopardy Game I made a few years ago when I worked for WIC. The rest of the week is Free & Clear. Yahoo!! Hoping to get all the schoolwork finished up early and work on some sewing for Christmas.

Thinking about

Trying to finish up all my Christmas stuff up by the first week in Christmas so I can just enjoy the month of December. This week is sewing projects. I will be getting the projects organized, cut, and pinned together. This most likely will not be done this week but might as well try.

Out of doors

This week we will finish stacking wood and splitting what we have. Later this week we will be getting some more wood to cut down and split. Busy week outside.

In the kitchen

I would like to make a decorate a pile of cakes this week. Why? I just love to decorate them. Hoping to find families to eat them 🙂 My youngest daughter turned 5 this weekend. I made her a Hello Kitty birthday cake and remembered how much I love it.

A photo from last week….

Here is a scene from the movie the kids made this past week. The grandmother is discussing something with her grandchildren. They are all at a party.

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Hope you have a wonderful week!

Monday Musings

Plans for the week ahead

Can’t believe it actually looks like a slow week this week. We only have Co-op classes today, Ice Skating tomorrow, and Bible study Wednesday. We have the November packets of schoolwork to finish this week. The main focus this week is making a video for a contest the kids found.

This weekend they started with talking about all the movies they wanted to make. I finally said to them that they just needed to do it! I told them they could have a good chunk of time this week to work on one if they could find a contest to enter. There would have been 4 movies being worked on if they didn’t have a main goal 🙂 So, they found one and are having a planning session today and start filming tomorrow afternoon.

Thinking about

I was able to finish up neatening up the hallway upstairs. I still need to organizer it. I have containers to spray paint to match each other. I bought the spray paint and have the containers (in varying colors). The containers will go below each child coat and snow pants. The containers are to hold that particular child’s ice skates, hats, gloves, and helmet for skating. Trying to cut down on the number of hats, gloves, and mittens around the house and get the hallway organized.

Out of doors

Brrr, it has been so chilly overnight. Tomorrow looks like a perfect afternoon to get outside and do some filming 🙂

In the kitchen

Hmmm, what to do, what to do… We have so much time home this week. Trying to use the oven and get the house warmed up on these chilly days. Lot’s of cookies being made. Thinking we should change our focus to muffins and quick breads to have in the mornings for breakfast. Love to make these in bulk with our commercial size muffin trays that hold 2 1/2 dozen muffins. That should kill two birds: warm up the house and have breakfast all set.

A photo from last week….

This weekend we had a great time just hanging out with some friends after church. Here is a  cute picture of both of our family’s youngest children.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hope you have a wonderful week!